January 28, 2023

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Code.org helps to close Baltimore’s computer science gap

Some much-needed money for computer science is going to a couple of schools in Maryland. Code.org, a national nonprofit group, is putting up $1 million to help bring more computer science programs to students in underserved schools. Students in Baltimore City are among those who’ll benefit from a portion of the technology donation money. Maree Garnett Farring Elementary School is among 102 schools nationwide and two in Maryland to receive the much-needed technology dollars. The school will get $10,000 to help transform its computer science program, one heavily focused on coding.”This is our eighth grade class. They are working on coding on Code.org, which is the sponsor of the award that we just won. They are learning coding, which is very important. The jobs they’ll be facing when they go into the workforce (that) will mostly likely involve coding in some way.” computer science teacher Ellen McGeorge said.”It’s an app you have to, like, it’s (kind of) complicated, but it’s an app where you can drag the characters around and explore new worlds,” student Arihanna Epps said. As part of the education prize, students enrolled in some of the lower grades at Maree Farring Elementary can expect new laptop computers.”I think it’s really good for our school, especially for our school equipment because they were really old, and so with that money, it will help us to get new and better equipment,” student Jeremy Moreno said.The school’s principal is giving all the credit to the classroom teacher who applied for the technology money.”It makes a difference when it comes to passionate teachers. I can have 100 ideas of what I want to have happen, but it means a lot more coming from the teachers because then they are excited about it because they are the ones who put the effort in behind it,” said Ben Crandall, principal of Maree Farring. Besides the money, teachers from the winning schools will get a no-cost scholarship to attend Code.org’s professional learning program.

Some much-needed money for computer science is going to a couple of schools in Maryland. Code.org, a national nonprofit group, is putting up $1 million to help bring more computer science programs to students in underserved schools.

Students in Baltimore City are among those who’ll benefit from a portion of the technology donation money. Maree Garnett Farring Elementary School is among 102 schools nationwide and two in Maryland to receive the much-needed technology dollars.

The school will get $10,000 to help transform its computer science program, one heavily focused on coding.

“This is our eighth grade class. They are working on coding on Code.org, which is the sponsor of the award that we just won. They are learning coding, which is very important. The jobs they’ll be facing when they go into the workforce (that) will mostly likely involve coding in some way.” computer science teacher Ellen McGeorge said.

“It’s an app you have to, like, it’s (kind of) complicated, but it’s an app where you can drag the characters around and explore new worlds,” student Arihanna Epps said.

As part of the education prize, students enrolled in some of the lower grades at Maree Farring Elementary can expect new laptop computers.

“I think it’s really good for our school, especially for our school equipment because they were really old, and so with that money, it will help us to get new and better equipment,” student Jeremy Moreno said.

The school’s principal is giving all the credit to the classroom teacher who applied for the technology money.

“It makes a difference when it comes to passionate teachers. I can have 100 ideas of what I want to have happen, but it means a lot more coming from the teachers because then they are excited about it because they are the ones who put the effort in behind it,” said Ben Crandall, principal of Maree Farring.

Besides the money, teachers from the winning schools will get a no-cost scholarship to attend Code.org’s professional learning program.